workworkwork

I saw a video recently, posted by a website about chronic illness, about not being able to work. The video really resonated with me, as someone who hasn’t been able to work since my MS diagnosis back in September 2012. I often feel guilty about this. Sometimes you just feel like you aren’t doing enough, even if you’re doing all that you can. The video I mentioned shared some thoughts from other people in a similar situation as me, and it really felt validating in a way. I know other people feel like I do about not being able to work, but just seeing some of the quotes specifically state it was kind of helpful for me. In the video it said things like,  “I would love to hold down a regular job. I would like to get to the end and feel like I accomplished something rather than live day to day”. This is something I really relate to. Having a job and something you can accomplish every day is taken for granted by a lot of people. Now I know not everyone likes their job, or wants to work, but when you don’t have the option to it’s a different story. I’ve had people tell me that they’re jealous of me staying home, which makes me laugh. I would truly love to be able to have a job and work every day and complain about it to my friends just like everyone else, but its just not feasible for me. MS causes me to have chronic fatigue, and pain, and trouble walking or standing for very long. I’m always light headed, and dizzy, and have trouble concentrating. But hey, if you want to trade places, I’m willing!

“No one realizes that a job does more for you than just pay your bills. it’s part of what gives you self esteem.”

It’s hard to feel like you aren’t doing enough of what people expect of you. Even small comments that I should try getting a part time job as a this or that can feel really hurtful. Trust me, if I could I would. I do some volunteer work which helps me feel like I’m trying, and one of the things I do is spend two hours a week at the humane society, which can be incredibly difficult for me, but it makes me happy and helps a bit with that feeling of fulfillment that other people may get working. Sometimes I just need to be thankful that I made it through whatever task I had that day. Maybe it was just an appointment, or making dinner. Maybe it was taking transit somewhere, or doing a couple hours of volunteering. Or maybe it was a really bad day but I made myself go to the coffee shop down the street just to get out for a bit. It’s hard to adjust your thinking to accept that this is enough, but life is hard. It changes. And sometimes you need to cut yourself a little slack and accept that you really were your best self that day even if it was just a small task, and this is something I’m trying my best to remind myself of every day!

M

this is the video mentioned in this post

 

New name, new look!

Welcome to my renamed blog, MSing around! This is still going to be about my life and navigating the world while living with Multiple Sclerosis, so this title seems more fitting then the previous “travelling MSer”. While I do still hope to travel more, and talk about it here, it’s just no longer the main focus, so felt like time for a change.

Looking forward to getting back to sharing, and writing about my experiences, and interacting with anyone out there reading!

M

Disability

I really haven’t posted in a looong time. I’ve said this before, and then give up again! I think I felt like I didn’t have anything important to say or was just complaining a lot. I also haven’t travelled in so long, but I’ve realized that this blog is just a good outlet for me, and how much I miss putting my feelings/experiences into words. So I’m working on renaming this blog, as it’s no longer really about travelling with chronic illness/disability, but just about me in general.

But theres that word. Disability. The D word. It’s a word that used to scare me. When I was first diagnosed with MS, I feared what it meant. I lived in fear of the possibility of becoming disabled. I would rather stay at home alone and depressed then show the world that I was different than how I used to be. I think it was mostly out of fear of  the judgment of others, which to be honest I still struggle with at times. I get a lot of weird looks, and the constant questioning of how I “hurt myself” gets tiring. I understand why people assume that, they don’t usually see someone in their (very late) 20’s using a mobility aid, a cane in my case, and they make assumptions about why I would need one. At time’s I think I should just come up with some kind of elaborate story on how I injured my leg mountain climbing, or doing some kind of trendy extreme sport, but then I remember that not everyone knows what Multiple Sclerosis is, and even if it’s small, I’m making a difference by sharing and explaining my MS to them. Maybe just once I’ll say it happened running away from an angry lion on my last African safari though….

I can remember when I first started using a cane, when I travelled to Italy with my family and my dad surprised me and brought a pretty one with a paisley design that I had been looking at online to help me on the trip (one I still use and love!) and I finally decided that it was true that I might need a bit of help. I think this was the start of me really accepting my diagnosis, and that oh so scary word, disability. I didn’t let anyone use that word to describe me, it felt so limiting. It felt like I was admitting defeat. I see it differently now, but it took time to get here. I’m a part of an online group for chronically ill/disabled people in my area and I hear people use the term so easily sometimes, to describe so many different things. Part of me is jealous of how just accepting the term ‘disability’ seems to come naturally to some people, but the other parts of me are really just happy to hear about it, and to be able to listen to other people’s struggles and have an open dialogue about my own! So many people are disabled in one way or another, it’s such a large spectrum, and I think I’m now actually okay with being on it. This is not something I asked for, or can control, this happened to me, like so many others. I think it’s more emotionally draining to ignore or deny that I am disabled, and just a few months shy of 5 years since my diagnosis, I think I’m finally okay with it. 

M